She’s Conservative: Stories of Trials and Triumphs on America’s College Campuses

The stories told in this book, She’s Conservative: Stories of Trials and Triumphs on America’s College Campuses, highlight how young conservative women face trials on campus. The women showcased overcame these challenges to become stronger, wiser, and more courageous. Some began their freshman year ready to take on the prevailing liberal narrative with gusto. Others took some time to come out of their shells. In the end, all are inspirations. All are role models. All are champions.

22 women from 17 schools tell their stories. Meet Emily, Vanessa, Caroline, Allison, Margaret, Emily, Mia, Brianna, Grace, Neetu, Taylor, Amelia, Jessica, Magdalene, Charlotte, Brooke, Sarah, Katie, Sophie, Brittany, Paris, and Rebecca.

With 22 essays from empowered conservative women, She’s Conservative highlights the problem of the lack of intellectual diversity on campus and in the workplace and how these women are overcoming it.

Copies of She’s Conservative are available for purchase on our website and on Amazon.

Endorsements

“It is so inspiring to see young women stepping up and spreading their conservative beliefs on college campuses across our country. These are the women who go on to become the business, government and cultural leaders of our future. I’m excited to follow the good work that they’ll continue to accomplish.”

– The Honorable Rebecca Kleefisch, Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin

“This book is all about women telling their stories and boldly speaking out about being confident with exactly who they are: conservatives. It’s a must read for anyone looking to be inspired.”

– Katie Pavlich, Fox News Contributor and Townhall Editor

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The Voices of She’s Conservative

These are some of the brave women who are telling their story in the pages of this book.

Emily Hall – “[Harvard’s] administrators, deans and professors must recognize the importance of promoting students’ engagement with ideas that challenge their preexisting notions — because a liberal institution doesn’t help liberal students learn.”

Vanessa Rivera – “As someone of Spanish descent, as well as a female millennial, many members of the campus community immediately assumed I was liberal. I was judged by the ‘non-judgmental’ left before i even opened my mouth to speak about my personal beliefs.”

Brittany Slaughter – “Students should be able to debate with one another and share ideas with each other without name-calling and rudeness or fear of being bullied. This starts with conservatives paving the way, standing firm and being the example the world needs.”

Brooke Reynolds – “We had wanted to start a conversation on campus. But it appeared left-leaning students were not interested in dialogue and debate.”

Charlotte Townsend – “Before arriving on campus, I had heard the political climate in college was definitely hard on conservatives. I didn’t realize what ‘hard’ meant until I took the hits myself. I live in a world where many of my peers are too afraid to openly support conservatism in front of their friends. I am open about my support of conservatism, which leads to regular battles.”

Taylor Roth – “Although I attempted to stay silent, my passion for political engagement, civil discourse and rigorous debate remained unsatisfied. If I truly valued the principles and ideas that make America exceptional, why was I so hesitant to stand up for them in an institution that was created for open dialogue and academic inquiry?”

Caroline Hakes – “It’s important to draw attention to bias in academia, but I believe the conservative movement is growing more outside rather than inside of classrooms – late at night over dorm room mac and cheese, in library study groups and yes, in sorority houses.”

Neetu Chandak – “While I expected disagreement from many Cornellians for my views, I was mentally and emotionally unprepared for the backlash, name-calling and threats to my physical safety.”

Mia Steupert – “[Liberalism is] so strong that the very ideals my grandfather fought for and cherished are at risk. I have committed my life to safeguarding them, starting with my campus. I want my children to grow up in a society organized around the same ideals for which my grandfather fought.”

Margaret Reid – “I want to help maintain freedoms for myself and every American. It all comes down to a conversation. Everyone has a story and reason for voting the way they do. Talking helps us understand that.”

Allison Berger – “Rather than deterring me from expressing my views, these experiences strengthened my conviction in the value of conservative beliefs, at the core of which are the inherent dignity and value of each individual person.”

Brianna Mirabile – “That is why freshmen are so fearful to speak up. They arrive on campus to make new and possibly lifelong friends and instead are cowed into silence for fear of being ‘othered’ and bullied. It’s something I faced, and I know many others do, too.”

Magdalene Horzempa – “To develop my talking points, I spend my free time studying anything and everything I can that articulates strong defenses of conservatism. My mission is to seek information and perspectives ignored and shut down in my classes and assigned readings. I have amassed an arsenal of facts — and the confidence needed to defend myself against a constant barrage of attacks. I am proud to report that I stand my ground.”

Grace Bannister – “We often go unseen because we do not wave vulgar signs and scream at passerby. We respect the beliefs of others while advocating on behalf of our own. We may not have been #WithHer, but we do believe in the power of women.”

Emily Jashinsky – “The picture that was crystallizing for me was one of a country where the elite class is increasingly distant from a whole lot of people between the coasts, the so-called flyover country. Their stereotypes are wrong, but they are so powerful, especially in shaping social norms.”

Amelia Irvine – “College campuses can make conservatives feel unwelcome. Some administrators act as if bias is nonexistent, even though it can be observed quite clearly. Some students act as if conservative opinions are rooted in either moral degradation or redneck ignorance. When confronted with facts and data to support our policy positions, these students resort to name-calling and attacks.”

Jessica Martinez – “Inspired to provide a place for a conservative message at Charlotte, defend ideals I cherish and show the campus community that being a Latina does not automatically mean I am a liberal, I launched a NeW chapter at my school.”

Sarah George – “In my experience, the supposed bastions of tolerance are only tolerant of the things they like. The purported champions of diversity demand intellectual homogeneity. And the so-called defenders of civility are quick to harass ideological opponents.”

Katie Yoder – “Grand gestures are something to be applauded – but so is persistence in standing by our convictions, day after day. By living my life unapologetically, I hope to encourage and embolden other young conservative women to do the same. Be a rebel and know: You are important. You matter. You are pro-woman, too.”

Sophie Czerniecki – “What I didn’t foresee, however, was that my personal and political stances would affect my grades.”

Rebecca Malone – “There is no singular image of what a conservative is or should be. And it is the responsibility of the diverse group of young conservatives within NeW to make it known that we are what a conservative looks like, too.”

 

 

 

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