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Femininity in Hollywood

April 10, 2014 | Karin

kirstencover-msc

Hollywood star Kirsten Dunst recently made some remarks about men and women in an interview for Harper’s Bazaar that are drawing the condemnation of feminists. Here is the part of the interview at issue:

I feel like the feminine has been a little undervalued,” she says. “We all have to get our own jobs and make our own money, but staying at home, nurturing, being the mother, cooking – it’s a valuable thing my mum created. And sometimes, you need your knight in shining armour. I’m sorry. You need a man to be a man and a woman to be a woman. That’s why relationships work…

The New York Daily News reports some feminist responses:

Pro-feminist thought blogs and websites quickly fired back at Dunst’s comments.

“Kirsten Dunst is not paid to write gender theory so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that she’s kind of dumb about it,” Erin Gloria Ryan at Jezebel wrote.

Ryan’s response is titled “Kirsten Dunst Thinks Ladies In Relationships Should Wife the F–k Out.”

And Stacey Ritzen at Uproxx — who admitted she’s “hated” Dunst since the 1990s — also slammed the “Elizabethtown” actress for apparently suggesting “women should know their place is in the home.”

It seems to me that Dunst’s statements are getting attention not because they are particularly inflammatory, but because they were said by someone from Hollywood. Why does some recognition of sex differences draw such condemnation?

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