The Price of an Intrusive Government

by NeW Staff on October 25, 2010 · 0 comments

I recently read about an incident that has been all over the news in America: a Chinese woman was forced to get an abortion by the Chinese government when she was 8 months pregnant.

Here’s the story from Daily Mail:

“An eight-months pregnant woman was dragged from her home and forced to have an abortion because she had broken China’s one-child-per-family law.

Twelve government officials entered Xiao Aiying’s house where they hit and kicked her in the stomach, before taking her kicking and screaming to hospital.

There, the 36-year-old was restrained as doctors injected her with a drug to kill the unborn baby” (2010).

First, let’s recognize a key point: China is a totalitarian government (even if they wear “mixed democracy” as a disguise) and it is unlawful for a family to have more than one child, but does law make the one-child policy just? Of course not.

With that in mind, let us ponder why some people in America believe China is a better run country.

From Gallup:

Although it shows less Americans know about Chinese leadership, the ones who do are more likely to approve of China’s leadership. I see this as a huge problem when stories like the above emerge because it is a direct clash with the American value system – life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Even our President has lauded Beijing’s industry during the Olympics, saying:

“Everybody’s watching what’s going on in Beijing right now and the Olympics.  Think about the amount of money that China has spent on infrastructure.  Their ports, their train systems, their airports are all vastly superior to us now, which means if you’re a corporation deciding where to do business, you’re starting to think, Beijing looks like a pretty good option” (2008).

For our own president to say that China has better infrastructure than America is completely closed-minded to the price Chinese citizens pay for their so-called “vastly superior” infrastructure. America has fantastic industry AND our citizens work on infrastructure while simultaneously enjoying the natural rights of humans.

Harsh laws that make good industry should not be praised by our President, and it should not be supported by Americans. Furthermore, the direct intrusion of government to accomplish those industrial goals should not be extolled.

I hope the shock of Xiao Aiying’s story shows America that there is a price to having a government that intrudes in its people’s lives, and that price is unjust laws and barbaric measures to maintain those laws like the one-child policy in China.

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