Feminists Fighting Faux Inequalities

by NeW Staff on March 19, 2010 · 0 comments

Do differences necessitate inequalities? Does equality of opportunity for the sexes in America necessitate that men and women occupy the same roles and enjoy the same outcomes? I would argue no!

That there are more men than women in the sciences is not necessarily an inequality. It may just mean that women gravitate more toward fields in the language arts. Sameness does not mean equality, sameness just means gender neutrality. And a gender-neutral society ignores or denies the inherent strengths and differences of men and women. Yet, feminist groups still cry foul and ask the government to rectify these faux inequalities. In fact, the new budget includes a hefty increase in the already large funding for the feminist agenda:

“The 2011 Budget increases funding for a new consolidated program aimed at recruiting and retaining undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in science and technology careers. In addition, the Budget provides for increased funding to the ADVANCE program, which seeks to increase the representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers and to develop a more diverse science and engineering workforce.”
From “The Opportunity and Progress for Women and Girls” in the Federal Budget for 2011 (
http://media.mcclatchydc.com/smedia/2010/01/31/18/Women.source.prod_affiliate.91.pdf)


This increase in the budget and the existence of an entire cabinet of women dedicated to righting these “inequalities” should be put into perspective by comparing them to
actual inequalities around the world. In India, little girls are born in brothels, and in Africa, women work hard every day yet cannot break through the grasp of poverty.

We live in a nation with incredible freedom and opportunity for women. If you want to fight for real inequalities, you can do something to help women in Africa lift themselves out of poverty. An organization called “Bead for Life” creates opportunities for the women of Uganda to become economically independent. These hardworking women sell beautiful, unique jewelry made from recycled paper with the entrepreneurial aid of the U.S. group Bead for Life, but are not dependent on aid handouts. Women in America can hold bead parties that sell the goods made by these impoverished women.

                   

                         

If you would like to hold a bead party or learn more about this great organization, visit http://www.beadforlife.org/indexA.html for more information. (Pictures above from Beads For Life)

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