Chapter 2: Day Care Good; Mother Bad

by NeW Staff on June 9, 2009 · 0 comments

It seems to me that it’s just role jealousy. That is the battle that radical feminists have waged on motherhood. Somehow they perceive that being a mother is not “as good as” being out in the working world.

Kate O’Beirne kicks off Chapter 2 in her book, Women Who Make The World Worse, with a quote from Simone de Beauvoir, the famous French feminist.

“Women shouldn’t have that choice [ to stay at home ], precisely because if there is such a choice, too many women will make that one.”


O’Beirne also cites Christopher Lasch, the cultural historian:

“A feminist movement that respected the achievements of women in the past would not disparage housework, motherhood or unpaid civic and neighborly services. It would not make a paycheck the only symbol of accomplishment . . . . It would insist that people need self-respecting honourable callings, not glamorous careers that carry high salaries but take them away from their families.”

Two liberal academics confess the following in their book, The War Against Parents:

“Important strands of liberal thinking are antagonistic to the parenting enterprise. Scratch the surface and you will find that many folks on the left don’t particularly like marriage or children. In their view, the enormous quantity of other-directed energy absorbed by families gets in the way of freedom of choice, and ultimately of self-realization. This is particularly true for women, which is why some radical feminists tend to see motherhood as a plot to derail equal rights and lure women back to subservient, submissive roles within the family.”


All these thoughts beg the question about whether it’s all just about “happiness.” According to the old saying: “If Mama ain’t happy, aint’ nobody happy.” Is this true?

Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse, author and professor, testifies:

“It took me an embarrassingly long time to realize that my two children needed me home more than they needed anything my income would buy for them. It took even longer for me to realize that placing my intellect at the service of my family was a greater challenge than my ordinary life as a university professor. I had accepted far more feminist premises than I had realized.”


Are there natural roles for men and women in society? Why is there such a campaign to restrain mothers from staying home with their children?

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